Monthly Archives: March 2014

Expungement Lawyer Not Allowed For Animal Cruelty Charges

Just as humans do, animals feel pain, loneliness, and hunger. However, they are victims without a voice and they must rely on others to speak for them. As a result, I feel that it is only fair that animal abuse should be prosecuted as a felony, not a misdemeanor. Additionally, I strongly believe that this is a crime that should never be expunged, regardless of how hard an expungement lawyer argues it should be.

Physical Signs of Animal Abuse

Generally, physical abuse is the easiest to identify and, perhaps, the most difficult for an expungement lawyer to fight for removal from a criminal record. Of course, open wounds, signs of numerous healed injuries, extreme thinness to the point of emaciation, fur infested with ticks, fleas, or other parasites, and patches of bumpy, scaly skin rashes are obvious causes for concern and should be reported immediately. However, there are signs that may not immediately be recognized as abuse. Examples include collars that are tight enough to potentially become embedded in the animal’s neck, heavy eye or nose discharge that goes without treatment, and signs of extremely poor grooming, such as heavily matted fur.

Environmental Signs of Animal Abuse

It tends to be more difficult to prove environmental abuse. Therefore, if a person is convicted based on strong evidence of environmental abuse, it should result in a felony charge that cannot be expunged, regardless of what argument is presented by an expungement lawyer. It is important to know what constitutes potential abuse and should be reported immediately. Indications of environmental abuse include pets that are housed in small cages or kennels that impede their normal movements, pets kept on chains for long periods of time or in small areas without adequate food or water, pets that only have unsanitary food or water accessible, pets that are restricted to areas with excess garbage, feces, or any objects that have the potential to harm them, and pets that are left outdoors without proper shelter in inclement weather, including extreme heat, cold, rain, or snow.

How to Report Animal Abuse

Animals put their faith in humans to protect them by reporting any suspected animal abuse. It is required that any report of alleged animal abuse must be investigated. The easiest and quickest way to report possible cruelty or neglect is by calling 911. However, you can also contact your local animal control department, humane society, or animal shelter to make a report. Be aware that most jurisdictions will accept anonymous reports of animal abuse. However, successful prosecution increases when a witness testifies. As a result, you should be willing to testify in court to make certain justice is served for the abused.

Every state has laws prohibiting animal abuse, and with the exception of South Dakota, they all have the felony provisions. Now, if we can just make certain expungement lawyers are unable to get these charges expunged from a criminal’s record, we will be moving even further in the right direction. The topic is sad, and now that it’s time for a weekly video, I’m going to end it with a heartwarming happy ending.

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Supreme Court Won’t Hear Md. Immigration Case

CBS DC

FREDERICK, Md. — The U.S. Supreme Court is refusing to hear a Frederick County immigration enforcement dispute.

The high court said Monday it won’t hear the county’s appeal of a ruling last August by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The dispute now goes back to U.S. District Court in Baltimore for further proceedings.

Salvadoran immigrant Roxana Santos claims that two Frederick County sheriff’s deputies illegally discriminated against her in 2008 when they arrested her on a civil immigration warrant in Frederick. She says they detained her and checked her immigration status only because she looks Hispanic.

The county says Santos raised suspicion by trying to hide as the deputies drove past her as she ate lunch outside her workplace.

(© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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Whose Religious Freedom Are We Talking About Anyway?

The Human Side of the Coin

The Supreme Court will be hearing a case this week that could go a long ways in terms of determining how our legal system understands the issue of religious freedom.  Two businesses (both secular and for profit) will be arguing before the Court that the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that they provide contraceptive coverage to employees is a violation of the business owner’s religious freedom (they personally take the view that contraceptive use is against God’s will).  

The legal arguments will revolve around the fact that a business is not an individual, and therefore doesn’t actually have its own religious beliefs.  I’ll let the lawyers wrangle out the legal details using the proper language and citing the appropriate case precedents. But I like to use the following analogy to frame the issue for people in the Jewish community:  imagine that a law on the books required any business that…

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